Basic Immigration Guide

Moving to another country can result in a lot of paperwork to deal with. That’s why we decided to write an article meant to bring you specific information and answer inquiries which may come up.

Depending on the purpose of your visit/stay in Czechia, different visa applications are available.



As a non-EU citizen planning to stay for more than 90 days in the country, you have to apply for a long-term visa issued by the Czech Embassy of your home country or the country where you have a long-term residence permit, and you’ll normally need to provide the following docs:

  • A travel document (ID or passport);
  • 1 or 2 pictures;
  • Proof of accommodation;
  • A document stating the purpose of stay;
  • Proof of funds to confirm sufficient financial resources for the stay in the Czech Republic.


1. Different types of visa for non-EU citizens:

  • Study: coming to the Czech Republic to study at a local school/university, the student can apply for a long-term visa for study purposes; its validity will cover the period stated in the acceptance letter issued by the school/university.
  • Employment:  it is no longer possible to apply for a long-term visa for the purpose of employment. This type of permit has been replaced by an employee card. Check out the blog post we wrote on this topic. For highly skilled employees the EU Blue Card is a good alternative.
  • Business: people owning a business or a trade license can apply for this visa normally issued for a 6 months-period. It can be renewed at a second stage in the Czech Republic.
  • Family: having one or more family members in the Czech Republic, the applicant is eligible to apply for a family-related visa to join his family.


2. Specific cases

Family members of EU citizens who are non-EU citizens not subject to visa requirements can stay in the Czech Republic for up to 3 months without a visa; travel documents must be shown upon arrival.

Family members of EU citizens who are non-EU citizens subject to visa requirements can stay in the Czech Republic for up to 3 months without a visa on condition that they hold a valid passport and a valid document on a temporary or permanent residence permit issued by a different EU country.



3. When the visa is expiring

When your visa is about to expire, there’s a series of procedures to follow. For further insights, have a look at our blog post: How to Prolong your Residence Permit in the Czech Republic.


4. Visa not required for EU citizens

If you’re an EU citizen willing to relocate to the Czech Republic, you don’t need any visa or other permits to travel, live and work in the country. You can enter and reside in Czechia without any restriction – all you need is your passport or identity card.

Nevertheless, don’t forget to notify your presence at the local Foreign Police office within 30 days upon arrival (unless accommodation is provided by a hotel).



5. Extra note: the Department of Asylum and Migration

The Department of Asylum and Migration implements policies to support legal migration while minimizing illegal migration, and it protects foreigners from persecution by state authorities. For more info, check out the Asylum, Migration and Integration section of the Ministry of the Interior website.


Camille Springaux

Camille Springaux

Hello dear readers, I am a French student living in Prague for a few months. I like to share my personal experiences and my travels with others. I'm also in love with food (especially the French one).

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