What does 1+kk mean?

Flats in the Czech Republic have some specifics when it comes to their description. We do not have two-bedroom flats or studios. We have 2+1 and 1+kk. Wait, whaaat? Let me explain. So there are two parts of the apartment size that you should understand. Let’s take 2+1 as the first example.

  • The first number (2) means how many rooms there are in the apartment in total. It includes both the bedrooms and the living rooms. In this case, that would mean that there is one bedroom and one living room, or two bedrooms – that depends on the flat itself.
  • The second number after the plus (1) indicates the number of kitchens. It is common for Czech flats and houses to have only one kitchen, but you might come across big houses that have more, like the two-generation houses (Two-generation houses are those where the grandparents live in one part of the house and their children and grandchildren live in the other.).
2+1 apartment. (Taken from bydleni.idnes.cz)
2+1 apartment. (Taken from bydleni.idnes.cz)
  • You may also come across some flats that have +kk instead of a number. Kk stands for kuchyňský kout = kitchen corner. That means that the kitchen is not a separate room and the whole cooking area is placed in one of the rooms. So, let’s say you have a 2+kk. That means you have one bedroom and one room which happens to have a cooking area in it as well.
2+kk apartment (Taken from cakovickypark.cz)
2+kk apartment (Taken from cakovickypark.cz)

And what is the difference between a studio apartment, 1+kk and “garsoniéra”? There isn’t any. It is simply a flat with one room which is a bedroom and kitchen together.

1+kk, studio, garsoniéra (Taken from cakovickypark.cz)
1+kk, studio, garsoniéra (Taken from cakovickypark.cz)

Clearer when it comes to those +kk things? There is another aspect to consider. You can also find a flat that is only 1+kk, but when it comes to square meters, it can end up being larger than a 2+1. When you are looking for an apartment, make sure you consider the size of the apartment in square meters, too. The larger apartments in square meters can be easily divided by furniture. If you are not sure how does the metric system work, you may use this website to convert the numbers to square feet.

Is it a standard for the flats in your country to have a wheelchair access? Lift? Wind shutters? Air conditioning? Well, then you are a lucky person, but in the Czech Republic these things are not considered a standard. Remember to ask about the smallest details when choosing a new apartment because what is perfectly normal in your country might not be normal here.

 

Avatar

Foreigners.cz